A collection of pictures, mostly of men and other things of my interest. You will find no full nudity but some pics are NFW. I do not own any pics, so if you see one that you own, please let me know with date of post & general description of the pic. I will remove the pic. Otherwise, enjoy. Let hear from you and your thoughts.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from plurdledgabbleblotchits  5 notes
plurdledgabbleblotchits:

"The United States had no warning. The nation’s most widespread natural catastrophe - yes, even more sweeping in geographical area than Hurricane Katrina in 2005 or Hurricane Sandy in 2012 - struck Easter weekend 1913 as the grand finale of what Mabel T. Boardman (volunteer head of the Red Cross who succeeded its founder Clara Barton) later called "an epidemic of disasters." Beginning with a dozen tornadoes - including one that still ranks as Nebraska’s deadliest tornado through downtown Omaha - the catastrophic sequence of events culminated with record flooding across all or parts of 15 states, which immobilized the industrial heart of the nation. More than 1,000 people lost their lives - more than perished in the 1871 Chicago fire, with property devastated over an area bigger than afflicted by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. And it was a rolling disaster, as over the following month the flood crests surged down the Mississippi, bursting levees….
please read the rest of the story here:
http://nationalcalamityeaster1913flood.blogspot.com

(Actually, they did have a warning and this was largely preventable, as Native Americans, after centuries of learning how to live in the region, had long known and warned about the massive flooding and the "Land of the devil wind" [Shawnee language concerning the frequency of tornadoes,] but the European white man did not heed their wisdom, and instead built their cities and towns immediately alongside the rivers of the U.S., as they had done in Europe.)

plurdledgabbleblotchits:

"The United States had no warning. The nation’s most widespread natural catastrophe - yes, even more sweeping in geographical area than Hurricane Katrina in 2005 or Hurricane Sandy in 2012 - struck Easter weekend 1913 as the grand finale of what Mabel T. Boardman (volunteer head of the Red Cross who succeeded its founder Clara Barton) later called "an epidemic of disasters." Beginning with a dozen tornadoes - including one that still ranks as Nebraska’s deadliest tornado through downtown Omaha - the catastrophic sequence of events culminated with record flooding across all or parts of 15 states, which immobilized the industrial heart of the nation. More than 1,000 people lost their lives - more than perished in the 1871 Chicago fire, with property devastated over an area bigger than afflicted by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. And it was a rolling disaster, as over the following month the flood crests surged down the Mississippi, bursting levees….

please read the rest of the story here:

http://nationalcalamityeaster1913flood.blogspot.com

(Actually, they did have a warning and this was largely preventable, as Native Americans, after centuries of learning how to live in the region, had long known and warned about the massive flooding and the "Land of the devil wind" [Shawnee language concerning the frequency of tornadoes,] but the European white man did not heed their wisdom, and instead built their cities and towns immediately alongside the rivers of the U.S., as they had done in Europe.)